Third-Person Effect and Pandemic Flu: The Role of Severity, Self-Efficacy Method Mentions, and Message Source

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dc.contributor.author Lee, Hyunmin
dc.contributor.author Park, Sun-A
dc.date.accessioned 2021-08-18T16:35:41Z
dc.date.available 2021-08-18T16:35:41Z
dc.date.issued 2016-11-18
dc.identifier.citation Lee, H, and Park, S (2016). Third-Person Effect and Pandemic Flu: The Role of Severity, Self-Efficacy Method Mentions, and Message Source. Journal of Health Communication. Vol. 21, Issue 12. https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2016.1245801 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11347/391
dc.description.abstract Within the context of a pandemic flu, this experiment investigated whether source (government officials or physicians), severity condition (high or low), and mention of self-efficacy method (mention present or absent) in H1N1 health news affected participants’ (a) perception of media influence on self and others and (b) intentions to get vaccinated. Results found support for third-person effects, and the magnitude of the effects grew with social distance. Main effect of source, as well as interaction effects among the independent variables on third-person effect and vaccination intentions, were also found. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Journal of Health Communication en_US
dc.subject Pandemic flu en_US
dc.subject Vaccination en_US
dc.subject Public health news en_US
dc.subject Third Person Effect (TPE) en_US
dc.title Third-Person Effect and Pandemic Flu: The Role of Severity, Self-Efficacy Method Mentions, and Message Source en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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