Rebel Reporting: A College Journalist’s Guide to Circumventing Administrative Censorship

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dc.contributor.author Buzzelli, Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-10T19:00:09Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-10T19:00:09Z
dc.date.issued 2015-07-10
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11347/26
dc.description.abstract Over the course of the past half century, the freedoms given to college journalists have been altered due to various court cases that have restricted what student newspapers can and cannot publish. Because each relevant court case dealing with suppression of the press has negated its predecessors, high school censorship has been applied to collegiate publications, inevitably limiting the rights given to the college reporters. However, there is only so much information administrators can prohibit from being printed because they do not have complete control of student media. As a result, universities have attempted to devise ways around the law so they can force the student newspaper to be a public relations tool for the institution instead of a professional development device. Nonetheless, there are ways in which student newspapers at private universities can print the truth without having to fear being censored. This paper will explore the means in which this is possible. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.title Rebel Reporting: A College Journalist’s Guide to Circumventing Administrative Censorship en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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